• fruit and vegetables in season in september

    In season in september Fruit Blood oranges Grapefruit Lemons Mandarins Oranges Pineapple Red papaya Rockmelon/cantaloupe Strawberries Tangelo Vegetables Artichokes Asparagus Avocados Broccoli Broccoflower Cabbage Carrots Cauliflower Chillies Chinese greens Gai lan (Chinese broccoli) Garlic Ginger Green asparagus Green beans Hass avocados Leeks Lettuce Mushrooms Onions Peas Potatoes Pumpkin Silverbeet Spinach Spring onions/green shallots Vine sweet minicaps The perfect blood orange sorbet 10 blood oranges 125g white sugar Juice of 1/2 lemon Scrub two oranges well, then finely grate the zest. Roll each orange on the work surface to release the juice, then squeeze until you have 350ml juice, fishing out any seeds (I used nine in total, but as they vary in size, its wise to have some spare). Heat 100ml of the juice gently in a pan with the sugar, stirring to dissolve. Allow to cool slightly, then add the remaining juice and that of the lemon. Chill. Freeze in an ice-cream maker according to instructions, or pour into a strong plastic box and put in the coldest part of the freezer. After 90 minutes it should have frozen round the edges – take it out and beat vigorously with a fork, electric whisk or in a food processor until you have a uniformly textured icy slush. Put back in the freezer and repeat at least twice more every 90 minutes, then freeze for at least another hour. Eat as soon as possible for the best texture.
    Last Updated 2016-08-25 00:00:00

    0 fruit and vegetables in season in september

    4.67 of 3 votes

    In season in september Fruit Blood oranges Grapefruit Lemons Mandarins Oranges Pineapple Red papaya Rockmelon/cantaloupe Strawberries Tangelo Vegetables Artichokes Asparagus Avocados Broccoli Broccoflower Cabbage Carrots Cauliflower Chillies Chinese greens Gai lan (Chinese broccoli) Garlic Ginger Green asparagus Green beans Hass avocados Leeks Lettuce Mushrooms Onions Peas Potatoes Pumpkin Silverbeet Spinach Spring onions/green shallots Vine sweet minicaps The perfect blood orange sorbet 10 blood oranges 125g white sugar Juice of 1/2 lemon Scrub two oranges well, then finely grate the zest. Roll each orange on the work surface to release the juice, then squeeze until you have 350ml juice, fishing out any seeds (I used nine in total, but as they vary in size, its wise to have some spare). Heat 100ml of the juice gently in a pan with the sugar, stirring to dissolve. Allow to cool slightly, then add the remaining juice and that of the lemon. Chill. Freeze in an ice-cream maker according to instructions, or pour into a strong plastic box and put in the coldest part of the freezer. After 90 minutes it should have frozen round the edges – take it out and beat vigorously with a fork, electric whisk or in a food processor until you have a uniformly textured icy slush. Put back in the freezer and repeat at least twice more every 90 minutes, then freeze for at least another hour. Eat as soon as possible for the best texture.

  • The Katering Show

    The Katering Show Anyone in the catering  industry, restaurant industry  or anyone into their food and wanting a great laugh? You must watch  The Katering Show Available on IView iview - the katering show   Warning - not for children
    Last Updated 2016-08-11 00:00:00

    0 The Katering Show

    4.75 of 4 votes

    The Katering Show Anyone in the catering  industry, restaurant industry  or anyone into their food and wanting a great laugh? You must watch  The Katering Show Available on IView iview - the katering show   Warning - not for children

  • What is in Season fruit and vegetables - August

    Seasonal Fruit and Vegetables - August Fruit Apples Avocados Banana Cumquat Grapefruit Kiwifruit Lemons Mandarins Oranges: Blood Oranges: Navel Pomelo Rhubarb Strawberries Tangelos Vegetables Beetroot Broccoli Brussels sprouts Cabbage Carrots Cauliflower Celeriac Celery Fennel Jerusalem artichokes Kale Kohlrabi Leeks Okra Onions Parsnips Potatoes Pumpkin Silverbeet Spinach Swede Sweet potato Turnips Witlof Sydney Catering Tips for Kids A great way for kids to eat some healthy vegetables is to lightly oil some Kale leaves and place in a hot oven for 3 minutes and serve straight away. The taste, crispy chips! Yum   What's New and Beneficial About Kale Kale can provide you with some special cholesterol-lowering benefits if you will cook it by steaming. The fiber-related components in kale do a better job of binding together with bile acids in your digestive tract when they've been steamed. When this binding process takes place, it's easier for bile acids to be excreted, and the result is a lowering of your cholesterol levels. Raw kale still has cholesterol-lowering ability—just not as much. Kale's risk-lowering benefits for cancer have recently been extended to at least five different types of cancer. These types include cancer of the bladder, breast, colon, ovary, and prostate. Isothiocyanates (ITCs) made from glucosinolates in kale play a primary role in achieving these risk-lowering benefits. Kale is now recognized as providing comprehensive support for the body's detoxification system. New research has shown that the ITCs made from kale's glucosinolates can help regulate detox at a genetic level. Researchers can now identify over 45 different flavonoids in kale. With kaempferol and quercetin heading the list, kale's flavonoids combine both antioxidant and anti-inflammatory benefits in way that gives kale a leading dietary role with respect to avoidance of chronic inflammation and oxidative stress. Source : WHFoods   Can You Eat Too Much Kale I was sent an interesting post about eating Kale, with the health benefits, nutritional facts, a some great recipes plus the potential side affects of eating kale. It may cause thyroid problems if too much is ingested in its raw form. The article is well written and informative by Joey Brono. Well worth a read!   Fruit and Vegetable season - September  
    Last Updated 2016-07-14 00:00:00

    0 What is in Season fruit and vegetables - August

    4.67 of 3 votes

    Seasonal Fruit and Vegetables - August Fruit Apples Avocados Banana Cumquat Grapefruit Kiwifruit Lemons Mandarins Oranges: Blood Oranges: Navel Pomelo Rhubarb Strawberries Tangelos Vegetables Beetroot Broccoli Brussels sprouts Cabbage Carrots Cauliflower Celeriac Celery Fennel Jerusalem artichokes Kale Kohlrabi Leeks Okra Onions Parsnips Potatoes Pumpkin Silverbeet Spinach Swede Sweet potato Turnips Witlof Sydney Catering Tips for Kids A great way for kids to eat some healthy vegetables is to lightly oil some Kale leaves and place in a hot oven for 3 minutes and serve straight away. The taste, crispy chips! Yum   What's New and Beneficial About Kale Kale can provide you with some special cholesterol-lowering benefits if you will cook it by steaming. The fiber-related components in kale do a better job of binding together with bile acids in your digestive tract when they've been steamed. When this binding process takes place, it's easier for bile acids to be excreted, and the result is a lowering of your cholesterol levels. Raw kale still has cholesterol-lowering ability—just not as much. Kale's risk-lowering benefits for cancer have recently been extended to at least five different types of cancer. These types include cancer of the bladder, breast, colon, ovary, and prostate. Isothiocyanates (ITCs) made from glucosinolates in kale play a primary role in achieving these risk-lowering benefits. Kale is now recognized as providing comprehensive support for the body's detoxification system. New research has shown that the ITCs made from kale's glucosinolates can help regulate detox at a genetic level. Researchers can now identify over 45 different flavonoids in kale. With kaempferol and quercetin heading the list, kale's flavonoids combine both antioxidant and anti-inflammatory benefits in way that gives kale a leading dietary role with respect to avoidance of chronic inflammation and oxidative stress. Source : WHFoods   Can You Eat Too Much Kale I was sent an interesting post about eating Kale, with the health benefits, nutritional facts, a some great recipes plus the potential side affects of eating kale. It may cause thyroid problems if too much is ingested in its raw form. The article is well written and informative by Joey Brono. Well worth a read!   Fruit and Vegetable season - September  

  • What is in season fruit and vegetables - July

    Season Fruit and Vegetables - July FRUIT Apples Avocados Banana Custard apples Dates Grapefruit Kiwifruit Lemons Mandarins Nashi Oranges: Cara Cara Navel Oranges: Navel Pomelo Quince Rhubarb Strawberries Tangelos Tangelos can be used as a substitute for mandarin oranges or sweet oranges.         VEGETABLES Beetroot Broccoli Brussels sprouts Cabbage Carrots Cauliflower Celeriac Celery Fennel Jerusalem artichokes Kale Kohlrabi Leeks Onions Parsnips Potatoes Pumpkin Silverbeet Spinach Swede Sweet potato Turnips Witlof   Witlof is great this time of year as it gives us some new ideas for canapes  as the leaves are slightly bitter and are the perfect vessel for serving and eating.   Home  
    Last Updated 2016-06-24 00:00:00

    0 What is in season fruit and vegetables - July

    4.67 of 3 votes

    Season Fruit and Vegetables - July FRUIT Apples Avocados Banana Custard apples Dates Grapefruit Kiwifruit Lemons Mandarins Nashi Oranges: Cara Cara Navel Oranges: Navel Pomelo Quince Rhubarb Strawberries Tangelos Tangelos can be used as a substitute for mandarin oranges or sweet oranges.         VEGETABLES Beetroot Broccoli Brussels sprouts Cabbage Carrots Cauliflower Celeriac Celery Fennel Jerusalem artichokes Kale Kohlrabi Leeks Onions Parsnips Potatoes Pumpkin Silverbeet Spinach Swede Sweet potato Turnips Witlof   Witlof is great this time of year as it gives us some new ideas for canapes  as the leaves are slightly bitter and are the perfect vessel for serving and eating.   Home  

  • WARM UP WITH ROOT VEGGIES

    How to cook with root vegetables TURNIPS Are great under rated vegetable, not only for roasting but try slow braising and add flavoursome addition to winter soup, especially chicken noodle soup. Just peel and chop. Yum! PARSNIPS Has a sweet unique flavour, try instead of potato. You can mash, roast , as wedges and our favourite, as fried crisps for garnishing some of our seasonal winter fork foods. For that added texture! Try peeling, slice lenghtways, lashing of olive oil, garlic, season with flake salt, a drizzle of maple syrup then roast until tender and golden.
    Last Updated 2016-06-18 00:00:00

    0 WARM UP WITH ROOT VEGGIES

    4.57 of 7 votes

    How to cook with root vegetables TURNIPS Are great under rated vegetable, not only for roasting but try slow braising and add flavoursome addition to winter soup, especially chicken noodle soup. Just peel and chop. Yum! PARSNIPS Has a sweet unique flavour, try instead of potato. You can mash, roast , as wedges and our favourite, as fried crisps for garnishing some of our seasonal winter fork foods. For that added texture! Try peeling, slice lenghtways, lashing of olive oil, garlic, season with flake salt, a drizzle of maple syrup then roast until tender and golden.